Using the Structured Dialogue Model as a Model for Violence Prevention and Health Promotion

Location: Guilford County, North Carolina

PROJECT SUMMARY: According to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, in 2015–2016, Black and Hispanic students represented 55 percent of Guilford County’s total student population but 82 percent of its suspended students. For every one white student suspended, six Black students were suspended. This research project employs the Structured Dialogue Model for violence prevention and health promotion in this diverse school district. The model allows young people to initiate and participate in a series of facilitated structured dialogues that focus on three major areas: (1) interpersonal and structural violence; (2) cultural misconceptions of violence among racially diverse communities; and (3) media representation and portrayals of violence. The project will follow a cohort of ninth grade students for two years and measure baseline and follow-up indicators of attitudes toward violence, delinquency, future aspirations, and critical consciousness.

Using the Structured Dialogue Model as a Model for Violence Prevention and Health Promotion
TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Charnelle Green, MS, Educational Consultant, Next Generation Academy, Greensboro, North Carolina
  • Brian Sims, PhD, Executive Director, Jomoworks, Greensboro, North Carolina
  • Dawn Henderson, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; Principal Investigator, Collaborative Health and Education Equity Research (CHEER) Lab, Greensboro, North Carolina

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