MEET THE FELLOWS

APPLICATIONS OPEN IN JANUARY.

“The community has the capacity to learn from one another, and apply research and data, to come up with solutions that meet their own needs.”

—NIKKI CROWE

[Pictured from Left to Right]

JOSEPH P. GONE, PhD, Director of Native American Studies and Professor of Psychology and American Culture, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

NIKKI CROWE, BSW, Program Coordinator, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College Extension, Cloquet, Minnesota

MELISSA WALLS, MA, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth

Interdisciplinary Research Leaders Fellows challenge themselves to apply their expertise and outside-the-box thinking to making their communities healthier and more equitable.

No matter what their background, training or discipline, they play a crucial role building a Culture of Health. They stretch beyond their daily work and collaborate with leaders from many other fields—building their leadership skills and creating change in their community and beyond.

Teams

Our current teams are working in communities across the country to advance projects related to the 2016 Interdisciplinary Research Leaders themes: Early childhood and health, housing, community development and health and the 2017 themes: Youth development apporaches to prevent violence and promote health, and individual and community resilience.

Displaying 15 result(s)

A Comparison of Resilience, Collective Efficacy, and Health in Two Historically African-American Neighborhoods in Houston, Texas
A Comparison of Resilience, Collective Efficacy, and Health in Two Historically African-American Neighborhoods in Houston, Texas
A Fighting Chance: Implementing a Collaborative Community-Based Group Mentoring Model to Address Youth Violence Prevention
A Fighting Chance: Implementing a Collaborative Community-Based Group Mentoring Model to Address Youth Violence Prevention
Applying Developmental Neuroscience to Incarcerated Adolescents (AD-in)
Applying Developmental Neuroscience to Incarcerated Adolescents (AD-in)
Building a Stronger Community: Resilience among LGBTQ+ People in South Texas
Building a Stronger Community: Resilience among LGBTQ+ People in South Texas
Building Social Environments That Promote Resilience among Youth Exposed to Violence
Building Social Environments That Promote Resilience among Youth Exposed to Violence
Identifying and Promoting Traditions of Strength and Healing on the Fond du Lac Reservation
Identifying and Promoting Traditions of Strength and Healing on the Fond du Lac Reservation
Interdisciplinary Research Leaders: Addressing Upstream Factors That Promote Youth Violence
Interdisciplinary Research Leaders: Addressing Upstream Factors That Promote Youth Violence
Juveniles at Risk: Using a Trauma-Informed Care Model with 10- to 13-Year-Olds and Their Families to Reduce Violence and Improve Health
Juveniles at Risk: Using a Trauma-Informed Care Model with 10- to 13-Year-Olds and Their Families to Reduce Violence and Improve Health
One Girl, Many Systems: A Collaborative to Improve the Road Ahead for Marginalized Girls
One Girl, Many Systems: A Collaborative to Improve the Road Ahead for Marginalized Girls
Project MIND: Promoting Youth Resilience, Health, and Safety through Mindfulness and Restorative Approaches
Project MIND: Promoting Youth Resilience, Health, and Safety through Mindfulness and Restorative Approaches
Redefining Resilience and Reframing Resistance: Evaluation of a Violence Prevention and Health Promotion Empowerment Program for Black Girls
Redefining Resilience and Reframing Resistance: Evaluation of a Violence Prevention and Health Promotion Empowerment Program for Black Girls
Resilience and Food Security in Black Belt Alabama through Land-Based Cooperative Economics and Communal Landholdings
Resilience and Food Security in Black Belt Alabama through Land-Based Cooperative Economics and Communal Landholdings
Resilience and Health in Immigrant Communities: An Examination of a Community Health Action Approach in Washington, D.C., and Prince George’s County, Maryland
Resilience and Health in Immigrant Communities: An Examination of a Community Health Action Approach in Washington, D.C., and Prince George’s County, Maryland
Using the Structured Dialogue Model as a Model for Violence Prevention and Health Promotion
Using the Structured Dialogue Model as a Model for Violence Prevention and Health Promotion
Young, Unsheltered and in Harm’s Way: Promoting Health and Development through Disentangling Youth Violence, Homelessness, and Criminal Justice
Young, Unsheltered and in Harm’s Way: Promoting Health and Development through Disentangling Youth Violence, Homelessness, and Criminal Justice

A Comparison of Resilience, Collective Efficacy, and Health in Two Historically African-American Neighborhoods in Houston, Texas

Location: Houston, Texas
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Community and individual resilience and health

PROJECT SUMMARY: The Greater Third Ward and Sunnyside neighborhoods in central Houston, Texas, are two urban, historically African-American neighborhoods with relatively high levels of poverty. But talk to the residents, and a portrait of two very different neighborhoods emerges—one (Third Ward) low-income but thriving, with community organizations dedicated to ensuring its survival and preventing looming gentrification, and the other (Sunnyside) low-income and struggling, with high rates of violent crime and disorder. This research proposes to explore, through a mixed-methods design, the differences between the neighborhoods of Third Ward and Sunnyside regarding resilience and collective efficacy, and the health impact of these differences. The findings from this research will provide critical information on the services and resources that are needed to build resilience and improve health in the Sunnyside neighborhood.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Felicia Jackson, MA, Manager of Family Support Services, Houston Area Urban League, Houston, Texas
  • Quianta Moore, JD, MD, Scholar in Health Policy, Baker Institute for Public Policy, Rice University, Houston, Texas
  • Rachel Kimbro, MA, PhD, Professor of Sociology, Rice University, Houston, Texas

A Fighting Chance: Implementing a Collaborative Community-Based Group Mentoring Model to Address Youth Violence Prevention

Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Youth development approaches to prevent violence and promote health

PROJECT SUMMARY: Youth violence, a major cause of morbidity and mortality that disproportionately affects African-Americans, is a pressing issue in need of targeted action given its negative impact on population health, well-being, and equity. This research project proposes to adapt, implement, and evaluate Take Charge!, a one-on-one mentoring violence prevention program, as a group mentoring model through a partnership between the YMCA of Central Maryland and Johns Hopkins University. The specific aims of the project are (1) through focus groups, key informant interviews, and an online survey, to determine what is needed to achieve readiness for staff of the YMCA of Central Maryland to work with at-risk youth who have been involved in violence-related events resulting in injury; (2) to adapt the Take Charge! curriculum to be appropriate for the group mentoring model; and (3) to conduct a pilot randomized trial in which assault-injured 10- to 15-year-old youth recruited from the emergency department are randomly assigned to standard care or Take Charge! group mentoring. Post intervention and at a six-month follow-up, the research will assess youth violence–related, mental health, and education outcomes using validated measures and mentor outcomes of knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Vanya Jones, MPH, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Michelle Becote-Jackson, MS, Senior Vice President for Youth Development and Social Responsibility at the YMCA of Central Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Leticia Ryan, MPH, MD, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physician and Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Applying Developmental Neuroscience to Incarcerated Adolescents (AD-in)

Location: Indiana
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Youth development approaches to prevent violence and promote health

PROJECT SUMMARY: Building upon adolescent research showing that connection to caring adults is a key protective factor, the Indiana project examines whether changing juvenile prison staff members’ perceptions about adolescents, and equipping them to provide evidence-based programs, improves outcomes. Through a mixed-methods, stepped-wedge design, this research evaluates a neuroscience-based intervention that will train staff in Indiana’s four juvenile prisons on the basics of the adolescent brain and improve their use of adolescent-specific de-escalation techniques. The goal of the training is to provide staff with a better understanding of the causes of adolescent behaviors and decision-making, explicit bias, the role of culture, and strategies for working with difficult adolescents. Utilizing a developmental neuroscience perspective and focusing on the positive aspects of youth and their rehabilitative potential, this research can contribute to best practices in juvenile justice reform.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Abby Hunt, MSW, Executive Director, Health Care Education and Training, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Mary Ott, MA, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis
  • Matthew Aalsma, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics and Psychology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis

Building a Stronger Community: Resilience among LGBTQ+ People in South Texas

Location: San Antonio, Texas
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Community and individual resilience and health

PROJECT SUMMARY: Research consistently shows that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) individuals experience worse health outcomes than their heterosexual peers, with LGBTQ+ people of color experiencing a greater degree of the overall disease burden. In San Antonio, the LGBTQ+ community is predominantly composed of Latino and African-American individuals. However, recent research suggests that individuals with multiple marginalized identities (such as LGBTQ+ people of color) are often better equipped to handle stressful situations because of greater resilience they have developed, due in part to experiences of dual identity stigma. This research project seeks to understand:

  1. the current capacity of San Antonio to address the health and social needs of the LGBTQ+ community.
  2. the underlying factors that contribute to health issues impacting this community.
  3. the different ways in which the community copes with both racial/ethnic-related discrimination and sexuality-related discrimination.

These questions will be explored through the creation of a community advisory board, in-depth interviews, and surveys. The findings will not only allow us to understand the experiences of LGBTQ+ people in South Texas, but will help support Pride Center San Antonio, Equality Texas, Transgender Education Network of Texas, and many other LGBTQ+ groups in Texas.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Phillip W. Schnarrs, PhD, Assistant Professor, College of Education and Human Development, Department of Kinesiology, Health and Nutrition, University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Amy L. Stone, PhD, Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology, Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas>
  • Robert L. Salcido, Jr., Executive Director and Board Chair, The Center—Pride Center San Antonio, Texas

Building Social Environments That Promote Resilience among Youth Exposed to Violence

Location: Kansas City, Missouri
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Youth development approaches to prevent violence and promote health

PROJECT SUMMARY: This research project proposes to investigate key characteristics of people and places that urban minority youth who have experienced violence identify as promoting resilience. In partnership with Youth Ambassadors, the team will conduct in-depth qualitative interviews, focus groups, and community asset mapping. This research will inform the development of a community-wide training and consultation model to support community-based organizations that serve urban minority youth exposed to violence in promoting resilience.

TEAM MEMBERS

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  • Jannette Berkley-Patton, PhD, Associate Professor, Biomedical and Health Informatics, University of Missouri–Kansas City
  • Paige O’Connor, Executive Director, Youth Ambassadors, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Briana Woods-Jaeger, PhD, Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Missouri–Kansas City

Identifying and Promoting Traditions of Strength and Healing on the Fond du Lac Reservation

Location: Great Lakes
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Community and individual resilience and health

PROJECT SUMMARY: This research brings together three American Indian collaborators to engage Fond du Lac community members in identifying existing and untapped sources of local strength for health promotion. For Fond du Lac and many other American Indian communities, recent losses, fueled in part by the opioid epidemic, are compounded by historical and childhood trauma experiences that represent important determinants of health inequities. The research team will work with a local community advisory board to implement a mixed-methods study to determine existing and underutilized community and cultural assets. Findings will be shared through structured community feasts and forums to identify action steps to promote healing and wellness beyond the formal, individualized clinical services already offered. A planned outcome is rapid impact on local policies and practices to facilitate reductions in suicide and drug (particularly opioid) overdose, and to promote healing related to adverse childhood experiences.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Joseph P. Gone, PhD, Director of Native American Studies and Professor of Psychology and American Culture, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Nikki Crowe, BSW, Program Coordinator, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College Extension, Cloquet, Minnesota
  • Melissa Walls, MA, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth

Interdisciplinary Research Leaders: Addressing Upstream Factors That Promote Youth Violence

Location: Oakland, California
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Youth development approaches to prevent violence and promote health

PROJECT SUMMARY: This research proposes to address upstream drivers of youth violence in East Oakland, California. Oakland is a city of roughly 400,000 people with extreme geographic and racial disparities in economic opportunity and health outcomes. Working with a local youth empowerment organization, East Oakland Youth Development Center, the team will identify, implement, and evaluate a sustainable and scalable model for reducing youth violence through summer jobs as a function of increasing youth’s social capital, civic engagement, and access to livable-wage jobs. Using a waitlist-control experimental design, the team will measure social capital and civic engagement, school or college attendance, graduation rates, employment, income, community disadvantage (a contextual factor), and violent delinquency. The evidence generated from this research will be valuable to communities seeking greater investment from their local governments.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Kristine Madsen, MD, Associate Professor, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley
  • Phillip W. Graham, MPH, DrPH, Director, Drugs, Violence, and Delinquency Prevention Research Program, Center for Justice, Safety, and Resilience, RTI International, Oakland, California
  • Regina Jackson, President and CEO, East Oakland Youth Development Center, Oakland, California

Juveniles at Risk: Using a Trauma-Informed Care Model with 10- to 13-Year-Olds and Their Families to Reduce Violence and Improve Health

Location: Boone County, Missouri
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Youth development approaches to prevent violence and promote health

PROJECT SUMMARY: The proposed project is grounded in one of our emergent community needs. Youth ages 10-13 are being referred to the juvenile office in Boone County, Missouri, for various behavioral problems. However, due to their age and the nature of their offenses, these youths do not meet the criteria for juvenile office services. If their behaviors go untreated, there is a high likelihood that their behavioral problems will increase in frequency and severity over time, causing negative consequences in adulthood. This research project proposes to measure, through a randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of a trauma-informed intervention for youth ages 10-13 who have contact with the juvenile office, and their families, who reside in Boone County, Missouri. Using a mixed-methods design, intervention effectiveness will be assessed by measuring mental health, physical health, family need, psychosocial factors, and anger management.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Clark Peters, PhD, JD, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, University of Missouri, Columbia; additional appointments, Truman School of Public Affairs and School of Law
  • Kelli Canada, MSW, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Rachel Jones, MEd, LPC, Director of Child Services, Central Region, Burrell Behavioral Health, Columbia, Missouri

One Girl, Many Systems: A Collaborative to Improve the Road Ahead for Marginalized Girls

Location: Washington State
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Youth development approaches to prevent violence and promote health

PROJECT SUMMARY: Washington state has the highest rate in the nation of locking up girls for noncriminal activities such as running away, skipping school, or violating curfew or rules of probation. Many traditional tools of juvenile justice systems fall short of supporting healthy environments for girls or their social welfare because many girls have histories of trauma, violence, economic vulnerability, and a lack of social supports. This research proposes to use a mixed-methods approach to better understand the needs and experiences of girls at risk for deeper justice system involvement. This study will focus on girls who are 11–18 years old, live in two to four diverse communities, and have received a court referral for a status offense but no criminal charges. The following questions will be answered through this research project: (1) What do girls in the community impacted by the justice system need? (2) What research-based priorities does the community want to improve for girls? (3) What is the impact of the intervention(s) on the girls from the community and state? By learning about the lived experiences of system-involved girls and co-constructing recommendations, key stakeholders will work together to increase coordination of services and change policies and practices.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Ann Muno, MSW, Executive Director, Justice for Girls Coalition of Washington State
  • Sarah Veele, MPH, PhD, Research and Policy Senior Manager, Rehabilitation Administration, Washington Department of Social and Health Services
  • Arina Gertseva, PhD, Senior Research Associate, Washington State Administrative Office of the Courts

Project MIND: Promoting Youth Resilience, Health, and Safety through Mindfulness and Restorative Approaches

Location: Washington, D.C.
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Youth development approaches to prevent violence and promote health

PROJECT SUMMARY: Project Youth MIND (Mindfulness Integration for Nonviolence Development) seeks to develop and test a novel intervention designed to promote the health and well-being of youth through an integrated model of mindfulness, restorative practices, and resilience education. Using a mixed-methods experimental design, this research incorporates the disciplines of anthropology, criminal justice, and social work. The project will be heavily informed by the lived experiences of District of Columbia youth, integrating their perceptions of the impact of violence, stress, and trauma into the research design. The two primary research questions are (1) how does an integrated model of mindfulness, restorative practices, and resilience education impact youth’s knowledge about the health implications of violence?; and (2) what is the effectiveness of an integrated model of mindfulness, restorative practices, and resilience education in reducing violent behavior among African-American high school youth?

The findings from this research will influence school disciplinary policies and will also contribute to our knowledge of how culturally relevant mindfulness and restorative justice programs can promote a Culture of Health among African-American urban youth.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Sharon Alston, MSW, PhD, Assistant Professor of Social Work, Ethelyn R. Strong School of Social Work, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia
  • Ivy Hylton, CRJT, MSW, LCSW, PhD, Co-founder and President of Youth and Families in Crisis, LLC, and MAAT Training Institute for Restorative Justice, lead contractor, Balanced and Restorative Justice Practices Institute for Juvenile Justice Reform, a program of the District of Columbia Superior Court Social Services Division, D.C. Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services, and D.C. Public Schools
  • Michelle Chatman, MA, PhD, Assistant Professor, Crime, Justice, and Security Studies program, University of the District of Columbia

Redefining Resilience and Reframing Resistance: Evaluation of a Violence Prevention and Health Promotion Empowerment Program for Black Girls

Location: Allegheny County, Pennsylvania
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Community and individual resilience and health

PROJECT SUMMARY: In Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Black girls are 11 times more likely than white girls to be referred to the juvenile court, while nationally, Black girls are referred three times as often. The proposed research will evaluate an empowerment-based program for Black girls designed to challenge negative perceptions, prevent violence, and improve their health via advocacy, restorative practices, and participatory research. This research aims to address the following questions via a mixed-methods, longitudinal and participatory approach: (1) Can an empowerment-focused intervention prevent violence and improve Black girls’ health? (2) Can this empowerment-focused intervention shift adults’ and girls’ narratives about Black girls? There is growing national awareness of the challenges faced by Black girls, and now is an opportune time to document and disseminate evidence-based models that address these inequities.

TEAM MEMBERS

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  • Kathi Elliott, MSW, CRNP, DNP, Executive Director, Gwen’s Girls, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Sara Goodkind, MSW, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, Department of Sociology, and Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Program, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Britney Brinkman, PhD, Associate Professor, Counseling Psychology, Chatham University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Resilience and Food Security in Black Belt Alabama through Land-Based Cooperative Economics and Communal Landholdings

Location: Black Belt Alabama
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Community and individual resilience and health

PROJECT SUMMARY: In the Black Belt South, African-Americans struggle with enduring economic isolation in seemingly barren spaces that are the relics of resilient communities built from a traditional knowledge that normalized cooperative structures and community institutions. The proposed study uses a lens of community resilience to capture patterns of traditional knowledge woven into the area’s culture surrounding health, food provisioning, and cooperative economics. This study is unique in that it will focus on health, health equity, and the Culture of Health by connecting production agriculture, landownership, and cooperative development to traditional knowledge. The proposed study will serve as the foundation for an emergent communal network that promotes a thriving local sustainable food economy through the following community resilience metrics: (1) advances the regeneration of traditional knowledge, the legacy of subsistence farming, and production agriculture among next-generation farmers; (2) stymies the epidemic loss of Black-owned farmlands and provides long-term land access to next-generation farmers; and (3) promotes community health through cooperative economics, farming, and alternative land-based enterprises. Our proposed research project will utilize various community-based participatory methods (personal interviews, focus groups, listening sessions, archival collections, land records, social network analysis, etc.) to identify the resources within a geographic subset of the Alabama Black Belt region to create and implement replicable community-centered solutions.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Tracy McCurty, JD, Executive Director, Black Belt Justice Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Marcus Bernard, MS, PhD, Director, Rural Training and Research Center, Gainesville, Alabama
  • Veronica Womack, MPA, PhD, Professor of Political Science and Public Administration, Georgia College, Milledgeville

Resilience and Health in Immigrant Communities: An Examination of a Community Health Action Approach in Washington, D.C., and Prince George’s County, Maryland

Location: Washington, D.C., and Prince George’s County, Maryland
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Community and individual resilience and health

PROJECT SUMMARY: This research project proposes to understand how the community action model of a Federally Qualified Health Center, La Clinica del Pueblo (LCDP), produces resilience and affects Latino immigrants’ health within two distinct policy environments: Prince George’s County, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. The project includes two aims: first, to further understand how LCDP’s community action activities contribute to resilience and health outcomes among the Latino and broader community it serves, and second, to compare resilience and health among Latino immigrants served by LCDP in the two different jurisdictions and policy environments. To address these aims, LCDP will provide the team with blinded health data for its clients and will support interviews and surveys to better understand how its clients and community members define resilience and perceive the effects of LCDP’s services.

TEAM MEMBERS

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  • Thespina Yamanis, MPH, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of International Service, American University, Washington, D.C.
  • Taryn Morrissey, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Public Administration and Policy, American University, Washington, D.C.
  • Catalina Sol, MPH, Chief Programs Officer, La Clinica del Pueblo, Washington, D.C.

Using the Structured Dialogue Model as a Model for Violence Prevention and Health Promotion

Location: Guilford County, North Carolina
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Youth development approaches to prevent violence and promote health

PROJECT SUMMARY: According to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, in 2015–2016, Black and Hispanic students represented 55 percent of Guilford County’s total student population but 82 percent of its suspended students. For every one white student suspended, six Black students were suspended. This research project employs the Structured Dialogue Model for violence prevention and health promotion in this diverse school district. The model allows young people to initiate and participate in a series of facilitated structured dialogues that focus on three major areas: (1) interpersonal and structural violence; (2) cultural misconceptions of violence among racially diverse communities; and (3) media representation and portrayals of violence. The project will follow a cohort of ninth grade students for two years and measure baseline and follow-up indicators of attitudes toward violence, delinquency, future aspirations, and critical consciousness.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Charnelle Green, MS, Educational Consultant, Next Generation Academy, Greensboro, North Carolina
  • Brian Sims, PhD, Executive Director, Jomoworks, Greensboro, North Carolina
  • Dawn Henderson, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; Principal Investigator, Collaborative Health and Education Equity Research (CHEER) Lab, Greensboro, North Carolina

Young, Unsheltered and in Harm’s Way: Promoting Health and Development through Disentangling Youth Violence, Homelessness, and Criminal Justice

Location: San Francisco, California
Project Year: 2017
Theme: Youth development approaches to prevent violence and promote health

PROJECT SUMMARY: Among youth experiencing homelessness, the potential for violence and its negative outcomes is exacerbated by multiple modifiable community-level factors. While effective youth violence prevention programs have been identified, most inadequately address the needs of youth experiencing homelessness, particularly those 18 to 24 years of age. Our multidisciplinary team will employ a mixed-methods design to identify and investigate the community factors that contribute to violence for youth experiencing homelessness in San Francisco, describe how criminalization and homelessness impact violence, and investigate how identified community factors can be leveraged or modified to protect youth from violence and promote their well-being. At the national level, our work is timely because it addresses an emerging awareness of the links between youth homelessness, violence, and criminal justice involvement. Locally, key stakeholders and youth leaders have prioritized violence as a key area for intervention for youth experiencing homelessness. We have a unique window of opportunity for synergy to implement the findings of our project to influence the approach to violence and youth homelessness, not only in San Francisco but also nationally.

TEAM MEMBERS

[Pictured from Left to Right]

  • Colette Auerswald, MS, MD, FSAHM, Associate Professor, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley; Co-Director, Innovations for Youth (i4Y), San Francisco, California
  • Sherilyn Adams, MS, Executive Director, Larkin Street Youth Services, San Francisco, California
  • Marguerita Lightfoot, PhD, Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); Chief, Division of Prevention Science and Director, Center for Prevention Studies and UCSF Prevention Research Center, San Francisco, California
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